Tag Archives: Salmon Fishing

Fishing in the Chilkat River in Haines with low Salmon counts

This year was not a great year for Salmon Returns in Haines Alaska. Haines Alaska Fishing was hampered by a closer of the Chilkat River to King Salmon Fishing. Just when you thought it wasn’t going to get worse, the Chilkat River was extra high this year, the high water and high silt content made fishing even more difficult.

So what does it mean when the fishing is hard? Should you take your rod and lock it in the shed? Should all the Yukon fishermen stay in Canada? Of course not.

There are always places that the fish will be. Salmon are predictable, and even in the silty Chilkat there are areas where streams feed into the river and the water clears up. There are places where the current changes and the salmon will stack up, and most of all, there are places that you will catch fish.

With low salmon counts a personal moral question comes up: if don’t need to go meat fishing, should you take fish out of an already reduced spawning pool? Personally I don’t. When I know that I am not going to be keeping the fish I catch I use barbless hooks, and never fish with baits that will be taken deeply. Handling the fish properly also helps to ensure their survival. I always say, do NOT pull fish out of the water if you do not need to, and if you intend to release them.

Good luck next fishing season, whether you are fishing in the Chilkat River for Silver Salmon, or somewhere else, remember to conserve our resources and enjoy the time you spend on the water.

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Filed under Alaska Fishing, Coho Fishing, Fishing, Salmon Fishing

Fishing in Petersburg Alaska for big Salmon and Halibut

I like to call it the Alaskan Double, King Salmon and Halibut on one trip out on the water. Fishing In Petersburg Alaska earlier this year I made it happen, although it was on accident.

While Trolling for King Salmon we had a few baits at different depths. One bait was running pretty deep and, as sometimes happens, a halibut came up off the bottom and took the herring. After finding the depth the fish were sitting at we were able to get a few nice Kings in the boat as well. We even ended up with one suprise Coho Salmon, they are usually not in the area at this time of year.

Petersburg Alaska is a very nice place to visit. It has a unique Scandinavian feel and is one of the most “Alaskan” small towns in Alaska.

City of Petersburg Alaska

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Filed under Alaska Fishing, Fishing, Halibut Fishing, Salmon Fishing, Uncategorized

Salmon and Halibut Fishing Season is Over, time for Crabs.

So for the most part the Salmon and Halibut fishing for this year is wrapping up or finished at many area streams. I hope that everyone had as much fun out fishing on the water as I did.

Its getting colder and for many people that means CRABS… one of the things I love about Alaska is the ability to set a crab pot, bait it, let it soak, and then return to a little trap full of delicious crabs just waiting for you to haul it up. What are your favorite crab baits? I find that almost any dead fish do the trick, but sometimes one outproduces the other. Pink Salmon are a favorite of mine due to their ready availibility.

Good luck to everyone and enjoy this colder time of year.

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Salmon Fishing – Spoons and Spinners for Silvers

So I have decided that my aboslute favorite lure for Silver Salmon Fishing is the Vibrax Spinner, followed by the Pixee Spoon. Both are made by Blue Fox.

When fishing for Coho spinners and spoons can be used in rivers as well as in saltwater. Look for a school of coho, motor over to them, and start catching fish. You can literally limit out in no time at all.

Another great thing about spinners are the ease of use. Tie on a snap swivel, click in the spinner, cast and reel it in. If you are new to fishing for Salmon in Alaska, try spoons and spinners first. You will not be dissappointed.

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Bears in my fishing spot, 10 things to stay safe.

So I was targeting some Silver Salmon on the incoming tide the other day at a local river. The rivers I fish are also popular with bears, and there was signs of alot of bear activity in the area. It is important to follow some basic guidelines with fishing in an area popular with bears. I came up with my own list of 10 things I figure would be good to do, when fishing in a bear prone area.

1. Fish with friends. Bears are less likely to approach a group, more eyes mean better awareness, and a friend can help if a dangeous situation occurs.

2. Carry protection. Bear spray is a good deterrant, but I would not want to be in wild bear country without a firearm as well, just incase. Make sure it is a weapon with enough stopping power, this is not a time to carry a .22 or .30 pistol. Think BIG, shotgun with slugs, high power hunting rifles, large caliber high powered handguns.

3. CARRY the protection. A gun or can of spray in the car will do you no good in many situations, If you can not get to it within a second or two it may be too late.

4. Keep your area clean and keep your fish in the water or a closed airtight cooler. Bears have a great sense of smell. If you cut a gill and bleed your fish in a shady spot in the water or place it in an airtight cooler you are much less likely to put out the scent of FISH FEAST, which will attract area bears right to your spot.

5. Don’t leave open food containers lying around. This goes right along with #4, you should avoid doing things that will attract bears to your area.

6. Be aware of your surroundings. You don’t want a bear suprising you, and you do not want to suprise the bear. Use your eyes and ears, scan the shoreline in both directions, look on the other bank and watch and listen behind you.

7. Make Noise. Make noise, talk in a loud voice, sing songs, and be sure that bears know you are there. Many times a bear will avoid humans, but in the rush to fatten up for winter some bears in the fall will still come to a river to feed when people are present so be careful.

8. If a bear approaches your area from a distance, try to move (not run) away if you can. If a bear is close, STAND YOUR GROUND. Never run away from a bear, because running could provoke a bears hunting and chasing instinct. If a bear is a good distance off though, and coming in your general direction moving away at a normal pace can often avoid bad bear contact. Be sure to take your gear and fish with you. If you leave fish behind that bear may begin to associate fishing activity with an easy meal.

9. Never harrass or feed bears. This should go without saying but there are some idiots out there.

10. Stand your ground and protect yourself if necessary. If a bear is focused on you, exibits agressive behavior, or is otherwise posing a threat STAND YOUR GROUND. Talk to the bear in a calm voice. If a bear continues to approach your area and gets close this is a good time to use bear spray or fire a warning shot at the ground or water infront of the bear. 

Guns should never be used to make up for foolish behavior in bear country. If you have to defend yourself with a firearm from an agressive or charging bear, shoot at the vital areas just as you would if you were hunting, this means CHEST (Heart and Lung) shots. Be sure to take multiple shots… a wounded bear is even more dangerous, and this is not the time to 2nd guess yourself or to be shy.

Any bear killed in defense of life or property has to be reported to the proper authorities. In Alaska, they will make you take the bears skull and hide and turn it in. This is to prevent people from illegally hunting bears or profiting by taking the valuable skull and hide, while claiming it was self defense.

Bear contacts that require defense are rare. You should always try to avoid contact with a bear if possible. By following and practicing bear safety, you should be able to avoid ever having to shoot a bear in defense.

Stay Safe, Stay Aware, and Tight Lines.

Other Pages of Interest: Salmon Fishing Information Alaskan Fishing Page | How to Choose a Fishing Guide | Department of Fish and Game

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Filed under Alaska Fishing, Coho Fishing, Fishing, Salmon Fishing

Saltwater Silver Salmon Fishing in Sitka Alaska

September is a good time to target Silver Salmon / Coho Salmon in saltwater in the protected waters of Southeast Alaska near Sitka. Recently we were out trolling around in a secret honey hole when we came into a school.

We were trolling herring, and as is typical when you get into a feeding school, there were times when we had multiple fish on at the same time. A good trick to targeting Coho Salmon is to change up the depth by having baits at different depths until you find the fish. Then quickly adjust your other rigs to match the depths of the ones that were on the fish.

On our first double hookup we got one of the fish in the boat and lost the other. We re-rigged and went back to troll through the school again. On the 3rd pass we had hit the right speed and depth and we got another double hookup. This time we landed both fish.

It was a really fun day on the water. Take some time off and get out fishing before its winter and all you can do is sit in an ice hut.

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Filed under Alaska Fishing, Coho Fishing, Fishing, Salmon Fishing

You can filet Salmon and other fish fast with the right tools.

There is no doubt that there is a certain amount of technique required to quickly make boneless filets from the big Silver Salmon, or King Salmon, Halibut, or other fish you just caught.

That being said the right tools make all the difference. Lets start out with the knife. A good filet knife is a combination of sharpness, strength, and flexibility. The knife needs to be strong enough to push through the flesh of the Salmon along the backbone. It also needs to be sharp, and hold its edge well, so that you can glide the knife through the fish instead of having to saw through it. Lastly is flexibility, you want a knife with a little bend in it, so that you can skin your filets and glide the knife down the backbone without your hand and knuckles grinding along the table like some kind of caveman.

One knife is used more than just about any other by fishermen here in Alaska, including the comercial guys, is the white handled Dexter-Russell Filet Knife.

Great Filet Knife for Salmon

Great Filet Knife for Salmon

This knife has a great combination of what we talked about before, holds and edge well, has a great handle with excellent grip, and cleans up super easily.

Another problem for fishermen is how do you get out those pesky pin bones without losing a buch of the meat. One popular solution is needle-nose pliers. Make sure they are clean and do not use the pair from your shop. A better solution might suprise you.

They are called needle holders, or sometimes needle drivers. It is a surgical tool used by doctors and dentists to suture wounds in tight spaces.

The right tool to take out pinbones.

The right tool to take out pinbones.

Why are these so much better then pliers? They lock in place, they do not slip, and they let you pull out bone after bone without having to repeatedly clean off the tip. You can pick up pairs of these surgical tools inexpensively online, and impress your freinds while the struggle with pliers.

Good Luck fishing and Tight Lines to you. For more information on Fishing in Alaska be sure to subscribe and read this blog regularly.

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Filed under Alaska Fishing, Cooking, Fishing, Halibut Fishing, Salmon Fishing