Tag Archives: Halibut Fishing

Big Halibut on Video… This is a true Alaskan Giant

This is a video I saw with a HUGE halibut… Had to share.

I am not going to make any statements on the politics of keeping large halibut, nor on the science that shows large halibut may not be any more prolific breeders than midsize halibut. Personally I do not even like the taste of the big girls… when I am meat fishing, I only keep Halibut under 50 lbs and if I by chance I hook into a giant, I safely release it whenever I can.

This is not me in the vid, but I hope you like it the same.

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Fishing in Petersburg Alaska for big Salmon and Halibut

I like to call it the Alaskan Double, King Salmon and Halibut on one trip out on the water. Fishing In Petersburg Alaska earlier this year I made it happen, although it was on accident.

While Trolling for King Salmon we had a few baits at different depths. One bait was running pretty deep and, as sometimes happens, a halibut came up off the bottom and took the herring. After finding the depth the fish were sitting at we were able to get a few nice Kings in the boat as well. We even ended up with one suprise Coho Salmon, they are usually not in the area at this time of year.

Petersburg Alaska is a very nice place to visit. It has a unique Scandinavian feel and is one of the most “Alaskan” small towns in Alaska.

City of Petersburg Alaska

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Halibut Recipe – Thai Halibut Curry

As you know I am a big fan of bringing exotic recipes to the subsistance fish that we all have stocked in our freezers. As good as fish and chips, smoked salmon, and baked halibut are every once in a while we need a change of pace.

This is a personal adaptation to a Thai favorite. A simple preperation with great ingredients that yeilds a healthy and flavorful meal sure to please everyone.

Thai Halibut Curry 

2 Pounds Skinless Halibut Filet (cut into portions
1 Tablespoon Canola Oil
1 Cup Diced Shallots (onion can be substituted)
3 Tablespoons Red Curry Paste
1 Cup Coconut Milk
2 Cups of Fish Stock (Chicken Stock could be substituted)
1/2 cup of Cilantro (Chopped)
1/4 cup Basil Leaves (Chopped)
1 Tablespoon Peanut Butter
1 Lime
Scallions for Garnish
Sea Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper to Season
Rice or Rice Noodles

Saute Shallots in the Canola Oil over medium heat until they start to turn soft and golden. Add in Fish Stock, Curry Paste, Coconut Milk, and Peanut Butter. Simmer for about 5-8 Minutes until Sauce reduces and starts to thicken slightly.

Lightly season the Halibut Portions with Salt and Ground Black Pepper. Place the Halibut in the pan with the sauce and spoon the saucce over the halibut so it is completely covered. Cover and cook for about 5-8 minutes until Halibut just flakes. Do NOT Overcook the Halibut.

Place some rice or noodles on a plate and sprinkle with the basil. Place the Halibut Portion over the rice. Add the Cilantro to the sauce and allow it to wilt. Squeeze a sprinkle of Lime Juice over the Halibut and then spoon the sauce over the fish and rice or pasta. Garnish with Scallions and Fresh Black Pepper.

Enjoy. This is a favorite in my family and I hope that you love it as well.

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You can filet Salmon and other fish fast with the right tools.

There is no doubt that there is a certain amount of technique required to quickly make boneless filets from the big Silver Salmon, or King Salmon, Halibut, or other fish you just caught.

That being said the right tools make all the difference. Lets start out with the knife. A good filet knife is a combination of sharpness, strength, and flexibility. The knife needs to be strong enough to push through the flesh of the Salmon along the backbone. It also needs to be sharp, and hold its edge well, so that you can glide the knife through the fish instead of having to saw through it. Lastly is flexibility, you want a knife with a little bend in it, so that you can skin your filets and glide the knife down the backbone without your hand and knuckles grinding along the table like some kind of caveman.

One knife is used more than just about any other by fishermen here in Alaska, including the comercial guys, is the white handled Dexter-Russell Filet Knife.

Great Filet Knife for Salmon

Great Filet Knife for Salmon

This knife has a great combination of what we talked about before, holds and edge well, has a great handle with excellent grip, and cleans up super easily.

Another problem for fishermen is how do you get out those pesky pin bones without losing a buch of the meat. One popular solution is needle-nose pliers. Make sure they are clean and do not use the pair from your shop. A better solution might suprise you.

They are called needle holders, or sometimes needle drivers. It is a surgical tool used by doctors and dentists to suture wounds in tight spaces.

The right tool to take out pinbones.

The right tool to take out pinbones.

Why are these so much better then pliers? They lock in place, they do not slip, and they let you pull out bone after bone without having to repeatedly clean off the tip. You can pick up pairs of these surgical tools inexpensively online, and impress your freinds while the struggle with pliers.

Good Luck fishing and Tight Lines to you. For more information on Fishing in Alaska be sure to subscribe and read this blog regularly.

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Tiny Halibut gets Fisherman $10,000 payday in Homer, AK.

For anyone who does not know about it the Homer Alaska Halibut Fishing Derby is about the coolest thing ever.

Everyone buys a ticket and goes fishing over a period of time, you do NOT have to be a professional, ANYONE can enter. Basically what happens is this, the top five people with the largest Halibut win BIG money. Also and I think that this is really fun, they catch, mark, and release a few halibut before the derby begins.

If you are lucky enough to catch one of these special tagged halibut you win a ton of money regardless of the size of the fish. That happed this year to one lucky guy named Mike from Oregon.

http://www.adn.com/outdoors/story/502733.html

His Halibut was only 8 pounds… we are talking about one tiny fish here, especialy by Homer Alaska Halibut standards.

Still he won $10,000. Not bad income for a day spent fishing.

What do you think?

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Halibut Fishing on the Lynn Canal

Halibut Fishing is one of my favorite activites. Growing up in Florida we used to head out deep sea fishing for Grouper. Targeting Halibut is done in much the same way. The Captain parks the boat over some structure and you drop your lines straight down to the bottom.

The waves that day were about 5′-6′ once we got out of the harbor. It was hard to keep the boat anchored over any type of bottom, but our captain gave it his best. Finally a short time after my bait had gone down, while were were anchored in a small cove in about 100′ of water near mud bay, I felt that classic twitch at the end of the line. I waited just a second and slowly reeled until I could feel something on the end of the line and then i set the hook hard.

Whereas before I just had a big chunck of dead pink salmon on my hook, now I had a beastly Halibut, that I would later find was just over 100 lbs, on the end of the line. It pulled hard against me, but I let the rod do alot of the work, as I slowly hoisted my catch from the deep blue water.

Finally we got the fish to the surface and quickly put a harpoon in its side. Then we took out the rifle. See you dont just fish for big halibut, you hunt them too. After dispatching the halibut, we cut a gill to bleed him and pulled him up on the boat.

Another great day on the Lynn Canal, Another great fish in the boat.

I love Halibut Fishing. Visit this Halibut Fishing site to learn more for yourself.

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